Connected and autonomous vehicles in Ontario: Implications for data access, ownership, privacy and security
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Databank
Mar 30, 2019
Electric Autonomy Staff

The transition to widespread adoption of connected and autonomous vehicles (CV/AVs) is underway in Ontario. Researchers estimate that about two-thirds of vehicles in Canada currently have some connectivity (i.e., embedded telematics); by 2022, approximately 70% – 95% of new cars in Canada will have vehicle to infrastructure (V2I), vehicle to vehicle (V2V), and other telecommunications […]

The transition to widespread adoption of connected and autonomous vehicles (CV/AVs) is underway in Ontario. Researchers estimate that about two-thirds of vehicles in Canada currently have some connectivity (i.e., embedded telematics); by 2022, approximately 70% – 95% of new cars in Canada will have vehicle to infrastructure (V2I), vehicle to vehicle (V2V), and other telecommunications capabilities (e.g., vehicle to smartphone). Currently, vehicles available to consumers are primarily Level 1 or 2 automation. While a number of major manufacturers plan to launch autonomous passenger cars in the next year, consensus in the literature is that deployment of Level 4 or 5 vehicles on public roads will not be commonplace until the 2030s or 2040s. In fact, major auto-manufacturers including Ford and GM have indicated their first autonomous fleets will be dedicated to commercial operations.

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