EV chargers
The Manitoba Motor Dealer Association (MMDA) is continuing its “Lead the Charge” electric vehicle charger investment program after receiving an additional $3 million from the Federal government this week. Photo: Manitoba Motor Dealers Association

The Manitoba Motor Dealer Association will distribute the NRCan funding to provincial organizations wanting to install public electric vehicle charging stations

The Manitoba Motor Dealer Association (MMDA) is continuing its “Lead the Charge” electric vehicle charger investment program after receiving an additional $3 million from the federal government this week.

The new Lead the Charge funding comes from from Natural Resources Canada’s Zero-Emissions Vehicles Infrastructure Program (ZEVIP). A previous investment of $2.5 million for 400 chargers also came from NRCan in July 2022.

“This funding is a pivotal step in MMDA’s initiative to dramatically enhance EV charger availability across Manitoba, encouraging more Manitobans to make the eco-friendly switch,” said Geoff Sine, executive director and CEO of MMDA in a press statement.

The program will offer rebates to successful applicants that install new electric vehicle charging stations throughout Manitoba. This funding round there is a focus on Northern and rural areas in the province.

Eligible applicants include businesses, Indigenous communities and enterprises, public institutions. Manitoba governmental bodies (provincial, territorial, regional or municipal levels, along with their departments or agencies) may also apply.

The EV chargers may be in workplaces and public places. These include areas such as recreation centres, libraries, town halls, curbside, service stations, restaurants, medical offices and park-and-ride sites.

Light-duty vehicles fleets may also receive funding through the program.

The MMDA plans to install the 300 chargers over the next three years with the $3 million.

Financial rebate amounts

Those wishing to access the funding need to apply to MMDA.

The amount awarded depends on the type of charger being installed. These are categorized as:

  • Level 2;
  • DC Fast Charge ranging from 20 kW to 49 kW,
  • DC Fast Charge ranging from 50 kW to 99 kW; or
  • DC Fast Charge ranging from 100 kW and above.

Eligible applicants may receive funding of $5,000, $15,000, $50,000 or $75,000 per charging connector, respectively, or up to 50 per cent of the purchase and installation cost.

For Indigenous businesses and communities, funding amounts range from $7,500 to $99,000, covering up to 75 per cent of the charger and installation costs.

“Many Canadian companies are taking the lead in manufacturing and selling electronic and hybrid fuel vehicles. Supporting those who invest in green alternatives with publicly accessible infrastructure is vital in Canada’s drive to build a clean economy,” writes MMDA on its Leading the Charge website.

The MMDA encourages businesses to participate in the funding program. It points to longterm benefits to businesses including attracting and supporting EV-driving customers, contributing to local green infrastructure and promoting lower carbon options.

The window to start submitting applications opened this week.

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